Innovation Byte

Choose one item below for 10 minutes of INNOVATION BYTE Practice

 To clearly define your problem statement:

  1.  Write a first draft problem statement, then ask “Is this the real problem we’re trying to solve?” ”Is this the real job we’re trying to do?”  If not, revise your statement.
  2. Write your problem statement in five different ways by changing language or wording. Write a final version integrating the best elements.
  3. Start with a statement of the job you’re trying to do (“How do we win?”). Then make a list of ten things you can do to make it fail (“How do we lose?”).  Rewrite each entry into a problem to be solved.
  4. Write your problem statement from the perspective of five different people/stakeholders (e.g. customer, friend, parent, cynic, child).  Write a final version integrating the best elements of each perspective.

For brainstorming new ideas to address your problem:

  1. funny-ideasGive yourself two minutes for each of the categories below to generate new ideas for solving your problem:
  • Good ideas
  • Bad ideas
  • Crazy ideas
  • Funny ideas 

Notice that you may have the most ideas in the category of “good ideas” and the least in the category of “funny ideas.”  If you learn how to increase your number of funny ideas, this strategy will help you use all parts of your brain to come up with the maximum number of radical new ideas. 

  1. Brainstorm in at least three different locations, including while walking or moving.  Walking is a form of meditation that is most conducive to creative problem solving.
  2. Find a colleagues and have a “Yes/and” (versus “Yea but”) conversation about your problem to be solved.  After the first person states their ideas, the second person says “What I like about that (adding specifics)…and (adding another idea). Continue the conversation for ten minutes.

For taking action that produces value:

  1. crazy-ideasStart your day with a “permission to fail” mindset and the assumption that failure is a “data-rich experience.”  Plan to ask yourself “What did you learn?” if and when failure occurs.  Make yourself a reminder card (e.g. “Fail often and fail fast”) and post in a visible place. 
  2. Identify three different actions you can be implementing concurrently so if one fails, you always have backups. For example, if you were cooking a dish for a special crowd you are trying to impress, you would bake one in the oven, one on the stove top, and the last on the grill.  
  3. Brainstorm in at least three different locations, including while walking or moving.  Walking is a form of meditation that is most conducive to creative problem solving.
  4. Find a colleague and have a “Yes/and” (versus “Ya/but”) conversation about your problem to be solved.  After the first person states their ideas, the second person says “What I like about that (adding specifics)…and (adding another idea) continue the conversation for 10 minute.
  5. Imagine a Dream Team to take the idea to action.  Think of three skills or talents you wish you had on this team.   Now think of why those skills or talents are important to the success of the implementation action. 

To evaluate the value of your idea:

  1. Identify five people that have accepted the innovation.
  2. Write down as many benefits the innovation has provided in 10 minutes.
  3. Choose if the innovation is internally valued (by the organization) or externally valued (by the customer).
  4. If the innovation created internal value, decide if its primary value is personal, professional or organizational.  Think about how the innovation can benefit the other two areas.
  5. Rate you level of innovation from a scale of 1 to 5 where 1 = an incremental innovation and 5 = a disruptive/radical innovation.  Another way to rate the innovation is to the level of newness to the value-added where 1 = low newness and low value-added and 5 = high newness and high value-added (see graph below). Remember that the innovation does not have to be a product innovation.  Now ask five other people to do the same. 

image-10-minutes-byte

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4 Responses to Innovation Byte

  1. Hi there may I quote some of the material found in this entry if I reference you with a link back to your site?

    • mindfulinnovation says:

      Hi Paris, go ahead and use the materials. Let me know how the process or approach works for you. Let me know what else you need. Regards, Natasha

  2. Good post. I study something tougher on completely different blogs everyday. It would all the time be stimulating to read content from different writers and practice a bit of something from their store. I’d want to make use of some with the content on my blog whether you don’t mind. Natually I’ll give you a hyperlink in your web blog. Thanks for sharing.

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